Pregnancy / Childbirth

Can I wear contact lenses during pregnancy?


Pregnancy changes a lot in a woman's life. It affects not only the appearance of the body, well-being, culinary tastes, but also the functioning of the eyes. And so it turns out that women who successfully wore lenses during pregnancy notice a lower tolerance for contact lenses. The main complaints that women complain about when using the lenses are: total or partial intolerance to the lenses on the eye, reduced comfort time, dry eyes, changes in visual acuity and general discomfort.

Can I wear contact lenses during pregnancy?

Pregnancy is a relative contraindication to wearing lenses. This means that you can still use contact lenses under specialist control and with certain rules. However, remember to:

  • reduce the wearing time of lenses to 6-8 hours a day,
  • use one-day lenses or shorten the life of monthly lenses,
  • use lenses with high oxygen permeability,
  • use oxidative liquids
  • apply moisturizing drops.

Why should you be especially careful during pregnancy?

Wearing contact lenses during pregnancy may not be as comfortable as before pregnancy. There are various reasons for this.

They are guilty hormones, and especially steroid hormones accompanying pregnancy and lactation: progesterone and estrogens, which disrupt the water and electrolyte balance causing water retention in tissues and edema. This also applies to the cornea, which increases in thickness. The cornea stops being translucent, which can affect changes in visual acuity. In addition, lenses o low oxygen permeability can increase swelling and increase discomfort when worn.

There are changes in corneal sensation during pregnancy. What is going on?

Do you remember the feeling when something caught your eye? Unpleasant irritation that causes blinking and tears? This is called corneal sensation, which is designed to protect and inform about external threats. The danger of lowering corneal sensation in pregnancy can cause that you will not notice / feel superficial damage to the corneal epithelium from which infections may develop.

The third problem is tear film quality disorders. Especially in the third trimester, women may feel dry eye associated with reduced tear production and decreased production of the tear film water layer. As a result of these changes, an increased amount of deposits may appear on the lens surface, which causes discomfort, impaired visual acuity and reduced hydration of the lenses.